Saturday, 23 April 2011

MR TREFUSIS IS UNWELL

Strictly speaking, Mr Trefusis is not so much unwell as broken: A couple of months ago, he was happily free-wheeling down a hill on his pushbike and, having built up enough speed for things to really hurt, promptly hit an inconveniently positioned speed-bump and came off over the handlebars.

Thankfully, the first thing that hit the tarmac was his elbow: if the force of impact was enough to shatter his left elbow and dislocate his right shoulder, imagine what it might have done to his helmet-less head?  I mean, I can't actually quite write that sentence without shuddering and sending up yet another silent prayer that he's still here so I can make pathetic jokes about my 'armless 'usband.

Of course, he's not literally armless, but he has been a bit 'elpless, and the road to recovery is long and hard. The dislocated shoulder was comparatively easy to treat with a spot of general anaesthetic and a couple of medical students standing on his chest to wrench it back into place, but the elbow has proved to be a bit of a brute - it turns out that Mr Trefusis has a displaced unstable comminuted fracture - I may well have those words in the wrong order, but in laymans terms, it means that his elbow is as buggered as it's possible to be and still vaguely connect the upper and lower arms. Of course, if you're an orthopaedic surgeon, buggered elbows represent a fantastically juicy technical challenge, and Mr Trefusis stuffed his up enough to warrant the attentions of a professor of orthopaedics, a senior consultant, a consultant and about forty five students for his five hours in theatre, and for the follow-up treatment, all working incredibly hard to give him back an elbow. And all for free, too: God bless the NHS.

Mr Trefusis continues to look as if he's auditioning for an AmDram Richard III, with his still-painful dislocated shoulder held slightly hunched and his broken elbow crooked.
Irritatingly, he refuses to launch into "Now is the winter of our discontent" as a party piece, which is rather unsporting: I daresay if I'd been through what he'd been through I'd resent someone trying to get comedy value out of it too. But six weeks on from the operation
the consultant has upgraded his prognosis from "will regain some movement" to "may regain full mobility", so perhaps that's as much cheer as either of us needs.

Update: a little more than six months on, Mr Trefusis is now back to doing forty press ups. I think the surgeon's prognosis of 'may regain full mobility' was something of an understatement.

14 comments:

K.Line said...

Oh, that's horrible! (Well it's good that, overall, he is well and healing). I broke my foot in the fall and it was quite a drama. 3 weeks of bedrest (I worked from home so it wasn't quite rest.) 2 months of physio. 3 months of constant pain. But I am well now (knock wood). Vaguely afraid to walk down stairs, but well. Wishing your husband a speedy recovery...

Liberty London Girl said...

Ayyyy. Do send him my commiserations. I've been there & it's aodding painful. Remind me to show you my right arm next time I see you: it's permanently bent at an obtuse angle from an elbow fracture when I was 8 or 9. But: everything works, glory be, and I am sure Mr T will be back to good soon. And yes, GOD BLESS THE NHS.

LLGxx

Alison Cross said...

Poor Mr T - my hubby rides a motorbike (ducati) and is VERY keen on helmets, even for cyclists.

He spends VAST amounts of money on helmets, but as he says, your broken arm can mend or at worst be removed. Brain damage ruins marriages and lives - altering personalities and so much more.

Our son wears a helmet. Yeah, I know, WE didn't and we are alright yada, yada, yada. But the truth is, they do not survive the same kind of traffic accidents that we can (adults)

Buy him a helmet. And he thereby sets a good example for the Minor Trefusis too.

And make him do the 'now is the winter of our discontent thing'

Ali x

Ania said...

Eek! Sounds horrible.
I must admit that DH and I don't wear helmets, though the children do. I think perhaps I am getting old though, as I have started to eye them up appreciatively in the bike shop.

Helena Halme said...

The Englishman keeps insisting on cycling everywhere since we moved to NW London and I am petrified something will happen to him (especially since I read One Day - silly, I know!). I insist that he sends me a text when he arrives wherever he's going. (He plays along).

I hope Mt Trefusis gets better very soon - I'm sure you sporting a nurse's uniform would help. (Sorry that was the Englishman's contribution).

Thinking of you.

Helena xx

Marie - wifeinthecity said...

Oh my, poor Mr T. And yes the NHS are wonderful aren't they. Hope they can work their magic and he'll be less of an 'armless 'usband for you soon! All get well very soon wishes your way!

Knackered Mother said...

Oh poor Mr T. My 6yo broke his elbow a couple of years ago, all mended now but my heart is in my mouth every time he climbs (which is what little boys are programmed to do, like, all the time). Complicated stuff, I remember the x-rays...hoping he mends soon. Happy endless tea-making!

Beautiful Things said...

Aw, sounds awful. At least his prognosis is improving. All the best. xx

spudballoo said...

Oh dear, tough news. Very irritating that he won't play along with Comedy Richard though >>crosspatch face<<.

The Whole Helmet debate is interesting, complex and boring all at the same time. I wear one because I want my children (5 and 4) to wear theirs without moaning at me. I know there is all sorts of reseach that shows that motorists react differently to cyclists not wearing helmets etc but, on balance, I'm not prepared to take the risk. A helmet and a very good cycling confidence course and a LOT of Hail Marys is my manta...

I love that you used the word 'pushbike'. I always feel so ancient when I use that term. You don't see it much.

Hope MrT is all better soon.

Mr London Street said...

Dreadful, but I completely understand you trying to wring comic potential from it. I write this with a tube coming out of my nose and attached to a box at my waist (it's a long story). I look like a crap robot, and my wife hasn't asked me to walk like one or anything. It's suspiciously nice of her.

Christina @ Fashion's Most Wanted said...

Dear Mrs T, oh! That's awful. Poor Mr T!

I would be lethal on a bike now which Is why I have stopped myself buying one many times.

Richard III did make laugh...

Hope all's good with you xx

Christina @ Fashion's Most Wanted said...

PS. Re Helena/The Englishman's suggestion, I have a great nurses uniform if you'd like to borrow it? xx

Lady Jennie said...

I'm so glad it was the elbow. Here's to fast healing and full mobility!

Motherhood The Final Frontier said...

So sorry! Poor man, and how shudderingly awful to think he might have landed on his head. I take it he'll be wearing a helmet next time he gets on a bike.
All the best for full mobility.
xo